NB_290_21_8 - NB 290-21-8 INV – Announcing the Availability of a New Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) - Wetlands Science Note
NB 290-21-8 INV – Announcing the Availability of a New Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) - Wetlands Science Note
National Bulletin: 290-21-8 Date: June 8, 2021
Subject: INV – Announcing the Availability of a New Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) - Wetlands Science Note 


 
 
Purpose.  To announce the availability of a new CEAP-Wetlands Science Note entitled “Headwater Wetlands Buffer Variability in Water Levels and Ecosystem Services at the Catchment Scale.” 
 
Expiration Date.  June 2, 2022
 
Background.  CEAP Science Notes are reports of studies that summarize CEAP findings that have program implications. Science Notes are available on the CEAP website at http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/technical/nra/ceap/.    
 
Explanation.  Headwater streams make up 79 percent of U.S. stream networks, while non-floodplain wetlands comprise 6.59 million hectares in the conterminous USA that strongly influence ecological functions and fisheries in downstream rivers, lakes, and coastal areas. These geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) are a major component of many headwater landscapes and are frequently connected hydrologically to downstream waters, affecting their function and the ecosystem services they provide. The study described in this Science Note explores the contribution of GIWs to services such as stream flow and water quality at the catchment scale in the Greensboro watershed, a sub-basin of the Choptank River Watershed of the Delmarva Peninsula. This study applied a hydrological modeling approach to assess the connectivity of GIWs with downstream waters, their aggregate impacts on the partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration and soil water storage components (i.e. water budget) and other potential functions over multiple time scales. The study findings highlight GIW contributions to groundwater and downstream waters, their effectiveness for mitigating streamflow variability, and the importance of ongoing wetland restoration and protection efforts. These findings may not apply to all physiographic regions since GIW contributions vary with local soil and landscape characteristics. 
 
Contact.  If you have questions about this bulletin or the attached Science Note, please contact CEAP Wetlands Component Leader Joseph Prenger at joseph.prenger@usda.gov.
 
 

 /s/

LUIS TUPAS
Deputy Chief for Soil Science and Resource Assessment   
 
 
Attachment – Science Note on Headwater Wetlands
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