NB_290_21_4 - NB 290-21-4 INV – Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) Science Note on “A Novel Geospatial Modeling Tool Can Infer Wetland Function”
NB 290-21-4 INV – Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) Science Note on “A Novel Geospatial Modeling Tool Can Infer Wetland Function”
National Bulletin: 290-21-4    Date: October 29, 2020
Subject: INV – Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) Science Note on “A Novel Geospatial Modeling Tool Can Infer Wetland Function”


 

Purpose.  To announce the availability of a new CEAP-Wetlands Science Note entitled “A Novel Geospatial Modeling Tool Can Infer Wetland Function.”

 

Expiration Date.  September 30, 2021

 

Background.  CEAP Science Notes are reports of studies that summarize CEAP findings and that have program implications. Science Notes are available on the CEAP website at http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/technical/nra/ceap/.

 

Explanation.  Wetland ecosystem services are affected by the level and extent of inundation, meaning the area is submerged or has surface water on it most of the time. Remote-sensing tools such as Landsat images and LiDAR can be used to create subpixel water fraction maps to assess the extent of inundation, but typically these are only effective during colder periods when the leaves have fallen off deciduous trees. In order to extend our ability to estimate inundation patterns of forested wetlands throughout the year, the study described in this Science Note demonstrates a more innovative geospatial modeling approach that correlates these remotely sensed data with more frequent hydrologic observations in the wetland-rich Greensboro watershed within the Coastal Plain of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The study shows that inundation patterns are in good agreement with climatic variability from dry to wet conditions and correlate well with flow data obtained from the U.S. Geological Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program.

Other findings and conclusions from the study include:

  • An improved understanding of inundation area and timing at the landscape scale will help determine the extent of wetland functions and ecosystem services.
  • Inferred inundation patterns are highly correlated with National Wetlands Inventory classifications of wetland water regime (hydroperiod). 
  • This information will aid conservation planners by helping to establish the connections between geographically isolated wetlands, their functional attributes, and downstream water quality and quantity.
 
Contact.  If you have questions about this National Bulletin or the attached Science Note, please contact CEAP-Wetlands Component Leader Joseph Prenger at joseph.prenger@usda.gov.
 
 

 /s/

LUIS TUPAS
Deputy Chief for Soil Science and Resource Assessment

 
 
 Attachment - Science Note on Novel Geospatial Modeling Approach
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