TN_190_PM_2 - TN 190-PM-2 – Plant Materials Program - Indigenous Uses, Management, and Restoration of Oaks of the Far Western United States
TN 190-PM-2 – Plant Materials Program - Indigenous Uses, Management, and Restoration of Oaks of the Far Western United States

Ecological Sciences Technical Note No.:

  
  190-2

September 24, 2007

Subject:     

  ECS – PLANT MATERIALS PROGRAM – “INDIGENOUS USES, MANAGEMENT, AND   RESTORATION OF OAKS OF THE FAR WESTERN UNITED STATES” 

 

Purpose.  To announce the release of the “Indigenous Uses, Management, and Restoration of Oaks of the Far Western United States” Technical Note.

Effective Date.  Effective upon receipt.

Background.  Oak woodlands and savannas are part of millions of acres of western range and forestry lands, harboring diverse plant and animal life.  Oaks are acknowledged as important to our biological heritage.  They are also extremely important to our cultural heritage—to the hundreds of tribes in the far western States.  By examining the many indigenous uses, harvesting and management practices of oaks, non-Indian and tribal landowners, in collaboration with NRCS field offices can incorporate this ancient body of knowledge in solving various kinds of problems that plague our oak landscapes today.  The National Plant Data Center compiled information for this note from oral interviews with Native Americans, review of the historic literature, and discussions with agency and university colleagues.

Explanation.  The attachment to this directive, “Indigenous Uses, Management, and Restoration of Oaks of the Far Western United States,” provides natural resources conservationists and other technical specialists with a broad knowledge of the cultural importance of oaks to Native American tribes, both today and in the past.  The document addresses the many uses of oaks for food, firewood, medicines, structures, weapons, and other products.  A segment is devoted to how Native Americans played a major role in the conservation of oak landscapes by keeping brush from acting as fuel ladders under the trees, knocking and/or pruning back the trees, and promoting widely-spaced and large-canopied oaks with light, frequent burning.  Various ways in which indigenous knowledge and management practices can be used in restoration of oak landscapes today, are proposed.

Filing Instructions.  Due to printing and distribution costs, the availability of this information is limited to electronic format.  If a paper copy is retained, file it sequentially within the Plant Materials portion of Title 190, Ecological Sciences, of the Technical Note binder.

Distribution.  This directive, with attachment, is available on the NRCS Electronic Directive System Web site at https://directives.sc.egov.usda.gov/.  After issuance it will also be available through the NRCS National Plant Data Center Web site at http://npdc.usda.gov, under “Publications”. 

Contact.  For further information, please contact the Ethnoecologist, National Plant Data Center, by telephone at (530) 752-8439.

 

/s/ Ronald L. Marlow for

LAWRENCE E. CLARK
Deputy Chief for Science and Technology

Attachment 

 

[TN_190_PM_2 - September 2007]